Mini KANET: Simple Fetal Antenatal Neurodevelopmental Test

JOURNAL TITLE: Donald School Journal of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology

Author
1. Nobuhiro Mori
2. Mohamed Ahmed Mostafa AboEllail
3. Kosuke Koyano
4. Asim Kurjak
5. Toshiyuki Hata
6. Kenji Kanenishi
7. Ikuko Kato
8. Takashi Kusaka
9. Uiko Hanaoka
ISSN
0973-614X
DOI
10.5005/jp-journals-10009-1586
Volume
13
Issue
2
Publishing Year
2019
Pages
5
Author Affiliations
    1. Department of Perinatology and Gynecology, Kagawa University Graduate School of Medicine, Kagawa, Japan
    1. Medical School, Universities of Zagreb and Sarajevo; International Academy of Perinatal Medicine; Ian Donald, Inter-University School of Medical, Ultrasound, Zagreb, Croatia
    2. Medical School Universities of Zagreb and Sarajevo; University Sarajevo School of Science and Technology, Ilidža, Bosnia and Herzegovina; International Academy of Perinatal Medicine, Ian Donald Inter-University School of Medical Ultrasound, Zagreb, Croatia
    3. Medical School University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
    4. Medical School University of Zagreb and Sarajevo; University Sarajevo School of Science and Technology; International Academy of Perinatal Medicine; Ian Donald Inter-University School of Medical Ultrasound, Zagreb, Croatia
    5. University Sarajevo School of Science and Technology; International Academy of Perinatal Medicine; Ian Donald, Inter-University School of Medical, Ultrasound, Zagreb, Croatia
  • Article keywords
    4D ultrasound, Antenatal fetal neurodevelopmental test, Developmental disability, Mini KANET, Modified KANET

    Abstract

    Objective: The objective of this study is to develop a simple antenatal fetal neurodevelopmental test [Mini Kurjak\'s antenatal neurodevelopmental test (Mini KANET)] for the prediction of postnatal developmental disabilities. Methods: Three hundred and fifty-three healthy fetuses between 28 and 38 weeks of gestation were examined using a four-dimensional ultrasound. Fetal behavior was assessed with the Mini KANET, which consists of three parameters (isolated eye blinking, facial alteration or mouth opening, and isolated leg movement). A score range of 0–1 was characterized as abnormal, and 2–6 was normal. Diagnostic indices for the prediction of postnatal developmental disabilities were compared between the modified and Mini KANET assessments. Results: There were 334 normal (94.6%) and 19 abnormal (5.4%) cases among the 353 fetuses studied with the Mini KANET. Four cases of postnatal developmental disabilities were noted among the 334 normal fetuses (1.19%), whereas four cases of developmental disabilities were found among the 19 abnormal fetuses (21.05%) (p < 0.0001). There was a significant difference in sensitivity between the modified (37.5%) and Mini KANET (50%) assessments (p = 0.001), whereas no significant differences were noted for other diagnostic indices between the two assessments. Conclusion: The Mini KANET may become a simple antenatal fetal neurodevelopmental test for the prediction of postnatal developmental disabilities in healthy fetuses. However, the data and their interpretation in the present study should be taken with some degree of caution because of the small number of subjects studied. Further studies involving a larger sample size are needed to assess the validity of the Mini KANET for the prediction of postnatal developmental disabilities, comparing with the results of modified KANET.

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