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Chapter-23 Counterirritant Agents

BOOK TITLE: Manual for Dental Hygienist

Author
1. Awasthi Maj Gen PN
ISBN
9789352702282
DOI
10.5005/jp/books/14199_24
Edition
1/e
Publishing Year
2018
Pages
2
Author Affiliations
1. Armed Forces Medical College (AFMC), Pune, Maharashtra, India; Indian Army Dental Corps, Dental Council of India; Manav Rachna Dental College, Faridabad, Haryana, India, Armed Forces Medical College (AFMC), Pune, Maharashtra, India; Indian Army Dental Corps; Dental Council of India; Manav Rachna Dental College, Faridabad, Haryana, India
Chapter keywords
Counterirritant agent, counterirritant, poultice, linseed, mustard, iodine, tincture aconite, camphor, menthol, turpentine oil, rubefacient, vesicant, pustulant

Abstract

The chapter gives a brief overview on counterirritant agents. The term counterirritant is applied to a group of irritant drugs which, when applied over skin or mucous membrane produces by sensory stimulation, a local inflammatory reaction of redness with sensations of heat and tingling followed by a moderate degree of local anesthesia from subsequent paralysis of sensory endings. According to intensity of reaction, these drugs are divided into three groups, namely rubefacients, vesicants, and pustulants. Types of counterirritants include heat, poultice, linseed and mustard, iodine, tincture aconite, camphor, menthol, and turpentine oil. Heat as a counterirritant is applied in the form of hot water bottle on the skin. In oral cavity, it is used as a mouthwash. Application of heat gives relief from dry socket. Hot mouthwashes relieve pain from abscess and ulcers.

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